Difference between revisions of "William Cabell, Jr."

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Colonel William Cabell, Jr. (March 25, 1759 &ndash; November 2, 1822) was the son of Colonel William Cabell and Margaret Jordan Cabell, born in Amherst County, Virginia (now Nelson Co.).<ref>Alexander Brown, ''The Cabells and Their Kin: A Memorial Volume of History, Biography, and Genealogy'' (New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1895), 129-130, 190.</ref> In 1775 William, Sr. built [http://small.library.virginia.edu/collections/featured/the-cabell-family-papers-2/cabells-times/cabell-family-homes/ Union Hill,] a home along the James River, which the younger William would inherit upon his death in 1803.<ref>Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, [http://small.library.virginia.edu/collections/featured/the-cabell-family-papers-2/cabells-times/cabell-family-homes/ "Cabell Family Homes,"] accessed February 23, 2017.</ref>
|imagename= William_Cabell.gif
 
|name= William H. Cabell Jr.
 
|honorific=
 
|1stoffice= Representative for Amherst County in the Virginia House of Delegates
 
|1stofficedates= 1796, 1798-1799, 1802-1805
 
|1stofficepreceded=
 
|1stofficesucceeded=
 
|2ndoffice= 14th Governor of Virginia
 
|2ndofficedates= 1805-1808
 
|2ndofficepreceded= [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Page_(Virginia_politician) John Page]
 
|2ndofficesucceeded= [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Tyler,_Sr. John Tyler, Sr.]
 
|3rdoffice= Circuit Court Judge
 
|3rdofficedates= 1808-1811
 
|3rdofficepreceded=
 
|3rdofficesucceeded=
 
|4thoffice= Judge for the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals
 
|4thofficedates= 1811-1851
 
|4thofficepreceded=
 
|4thofficesucceeded=
 
|5thoffice= 6th Chief Justice of Virginia
 
|5thofficedates= 1842-1851
 
|5thofficepreceded= [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_St._George_Tucker,_Sr. Henry St. George Tucker, Sr.]
 
|5thofficesucceeded= [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J._Allen_(judge) John J. Allen]
 
|6thoffice=
 
|6thofficedates=
 
|6thofficepreceded=
 
|6thofficesucceeded=
 
|7thoffice=
 
|7thofficedates=
 
|7thofficepreceded=
 
|7thofficesucceeded=
 
|borndate= December 16, 1772
 
|bornplace= Cumberland County, Virginia
 
|dieddate= January 12, 1853
 
|diedplace= Richmond, Virginia
 
|restingplace= Shockoe Hill Cemetery
 
|residence= "Montevideo" in Buckingham County, Virginia
 
|education= Hampton Sydney College; The College of William & Mary
 
|almamater= The College of William & Mary
 
|profession= lawyer, judge, politician
 
|spouse= Elizabeth Cabell, Agnes Gamble
 
|relatives= [http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Cabell_Joseph_C_1778-1856 Joseph Carrington Cabell]
 
|knownfor=
 
}}
 
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Cabell William Cabell Jr.] was born on December 16, 1772, at "Boston Hill" in Cumberland County, Virginia, to Colonel Nicholas Cabell and Hannah Carrington Cabell. Cabell attended Hampton Sydney College in 1785 before studying law under [[George Wythe]] at the College of William & Mary. In 1793 Wythe moved to Richmond and Cabell followed in order to complete his legal studies. In 1794 Cabell received his license to practice law. <ref> ''American National Biography Online'', s.v. "Cabell, William H.," by F. Thornton Miller, accessed March 2, 2016. </ref>
 
  
During three different sessions (1796, 1798-1799, 1802-1805), Cabell represented Amherst County in the Virginia House of Delegates. He was proud of voting for the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_and_Virginia_Resolutions Virginia Resolutions] (declaring the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alien_and_Sedition_Acts Alien & Sedition Acts] unconstitutional) as well as voting for [[Thomas Jefferson]] in the Electoral College. <ref> Ibid. </ref>
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The second of seven children, William, Jr. was taught by series of private tutors, sometimes boarding at their homes with his older brother, Samuel Jordan Cabell. William later went on to attend Hampden-Sydney Academy, from August, 1777 until April, 1779. In May, 1779 he entered the College of William & Mary, where he remained until September, 1780. He was treasurer of [[wikipedia:Phi Beta Kappa Society|Phi Betta Kappa]] during this time,<ref>Brown, 190-191.</ref> and may have attended law classes with [[George Wythe]].<ref>William Clarkin, ''Serene Patriot: A Life of George Wythe'' (Albany: NY: Alan Publications, 1970), 144, n3.</ref>
 
 
In 1805 Cabell became the fourteenth governor of Virginia and served the maximum three one-year terms. His time as governor was "marked by [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Burr Aaron Burr]'s trial in Richmond for alleged treason, by the celebration of Virginia's sesquicentennial at Jamestown, and by the United States prohibtion of importation of slaves from Africa." <ref> "[http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_virginia/col2-content/main-content-list/title_cabell_william.default.html Virginia Governor William Henry Cabell]," National Governors Association: The Collective Voice of the Nation's Governors, accessed March 2, 2016. </ref> Cabell also dealt with rioting and issues of national defense during the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesapeake%E2%80%93Leopard_Affair Chesapeake Affair] of 1807, the incident that lead to Jefferson's [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embargo_Act_of_1807 Embargo Act]. <ref> Edwin M. Gaines, "The Chesapeake Affair: Virginians Mobilize to Defend National Honor," ''The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography'', Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 1956), pp. 131-142. </ref>
 
 
 
However, Cabell "was committed to a career in law" and his true desire was to become a judge of the General Court. In 1808 Cabell was appointed to the General Court for the circuit including Richmond and counties along the James River. In 1811 he took a seat on the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. In 1842 Cabell became the sixth chief justice of Virginia when the legislature "elevated him to president of the court." <ref> Miller, "Cabell, William H." </ref> He and [[Spencer Roane]] worked to defend State's Rights and "fought as 'Old Republicans' against the federal government" in Martin v. Hunter's Lessee. <ref> "[http://small.library.virginia.edu/collections/featured/the-cabell-family-papers-2/biographies/genealogy/william-h-cabell/ William H. Cabell (1772-1853)]," Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library (Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, 2016), accessed March 1, 2016. </ref> Cabell remained in that position until 1851. <ref> Miller, "Cabell, William H." </ref>
 
 
 
Cabell also served on the board of commissioners in 1818 "to determine the site and formulate a plan for funding the University of Virginia." And from 1809 until 1830 he served as a trustee of Hampden Sydney College. <ref> Ibid. </ref>
 
 
 
Cabell was known for being practical and down-to-earth, giving "little credence to flowery rhetoric and courtroom showmanship" in favor of a common-sense approach. When not on the bench, Cabell resided at his Buckingham County plantation "Montevideo" on the James River. <ref> Miller, "Cabell, William H.;" "William H. Cabell (1772-1853)." </ref> On January 12, 1853, Cabell passed away in his Richmond home and was buried in the Shockoe Hill Cemetery. <ref> "Virginia Governor William Henry Cabell." </ref>
 
 
 
In 1795 Cabell married his cousin Elizabeth Cabell, with whom he had three children. Four years after Elizabeth's death in 1801, Cabell married Agnes Gamble (or Agnes S. B. Cabell), with whom he had eight children. <ref> Ibid. </ref>  
 
  
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During the [[wikipedia:American Revolution|American Revolution]], Cabell served as major in the Amherst County Militia (ultimately rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1798),<ref>Find A Grave, [https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=113579837 "Col William Cabell, Jr,"] accessed February 23, 2017.</ref> and he served as a member of the Virginia General Assembly from 1789 through 1791, and again from 1793 through 1797.<ref>Brown, 199.</ref>
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
[[Wythe the Teacher]]
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*[[Teaching of George Wythe|The Teaching of George Wythe]]
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*[[Wythe the Teacher]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 08:44, 24 February 2017

Colonel William Cabell, Jr. (March 25, 1759 – November 2, 1822) was the son of Colonel William Cabell and Margaret Jordan Cabell, born in Amherst County, Virginia (now Nelson Co.).[1] In 1775 William, Sr. built Union Hill, a home along the James River, which the younger William would inherit upon his death in 1803.[2]

The second of seven children, William, Jr. was taught by series of private tutors, sometimes boarding at their homes with his older brother, Samuel Jordan Cabell. William later went on to attend Hampden-Sydney Academy, from August, 1777 until April, 1779. In May, 1779 he entered the College of William & Mary, where he remained until September, 1780. He was treasurer of Phi Betta Kappa during this time,[3] and may have attended law classes with George Wythe.[4]

During the American Revolution, Cabell served as major in the Amherst County Militia (ultimately rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1798),[5] and he served as a member of the Virginia General Assembly from 1789 through 1791, and again from 1793 through 1797.[6]

See also

References

  1. Alexander Brown, The Cabells and Their Kin: A Memorial Volume of History, Biography, and Genealogy (New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1895), 129-130, 190.
  2. Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, "Cabell Family Homes," accessed February 23, 2017.
  3. Brown, 190-191.
  4. William Clarkin, Serene Patriot: A Life of George Wythe (Albany: NY: Alan Publications, 1970), 144, n3.
  5. Find A Grave, "Col William Cabell, Jr," accessed February 23, 2017.
  6. Brown, 199.