James Madison, Bishop

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The Right Reverend Dr.
James Madison
BishopJamesMadison.jpg
Bishop, Episcopal Diocese of Virginia
In office
1790 – 1812
Preceded by Inaugural holder
Succeeded by
President, College of William & Mary
In office
1777 – 1812
Preceded by John Camm
Succeeded by John Bracken
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In office
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Personal details
Born August 27, 1749
 
Died March 6, 1812
 
Resting place
Residence(s)
Education
Alma mater
Profession
Spouse(s)
Relatives John Madison (father)
Agatha Strother (mother)
James Madison, Jr. (cousin)
Known for
Signature [[File:|left|200px]]

James Madison (1749 – 1812) was president of the College of William & Mary from 1777 to 1812, first bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Virginia, and a cousin of James Madison, Jr., later the fourth President of the United States.

Bishop Madison attended the College of William & Mary, graduating with high honors in 1771. After studying with George Wythe, he was admitted to the bar but never chose to pursue a legal career. Instead, in 1773, he was elected professor of natural philosophy and mathematics at the college. After a brief stint in England to further his studies and seek ordination to the ministry of the Church of England, he returned to Williamsburg and his position as a professor at the college. In 1777, the Board of Visitors elected him president of the college, a position he would hold until his death. In 1779, he worked with Thomas Jefferson (then Governor of Virginia and a member of the college's Board of Visitors), to create the position of Professor of Law and Police at William & Mary.

Following the Revolution, Madison played an instrumental role in the reorganization of the Episcopal Church in Virginia and was elected bishop in 1790. Madison died on March 6, 1812 and was buried in the chapel at the College of William & Mary.