Difference between revisions of "Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 23 June 1801"

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[[File:JeffersonToWytheJune231801.jpg|right|thumb|200px|<p>"Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 23 June 1801." Image from the [http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mtj.mtjbib010223 Library of Congress,] ''The Thomas Jefferson Papers.''</p>]]
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''Note: In certain areas of Jefferson's letter, the writing is either faint or missing making it illegible.''
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<p>[[Thomas Jefferson]] says that he received [[George Wythe|Wythe]]'s letter from [[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 19 June 1801| June 19]] at the same time as the first letter Wythe sent regarding the same subject.  Jefferson had his secretary, [[Wikipedia: Meriwether Lewis| Captain Lewis]], take measures to get the payment from the debtor who was located on the southern frontier of Georgia.  He says that the payment should take around 6 or 8 weeks if the debtor did make the payment.</p>
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[[File:JeffersonToWytheJune231801.jpg|right|thumb|300px|<p>"Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 23 June 1801." Image from the [http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mtj.mtjbib010223 Library of Congress,] ''The Thomas Jefferson Papers.''</p>]]
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==Letter text==
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<blockquote>
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[[Thomas Jefferson|Th J.]] to [[George Wythe|G. Wythe]]
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Yours of the [[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 19 June 1801|19th]] is this moment received, the moment your former one came to hand. I engaged Capt. Lewis, my secretary, to take measures for procuring paiment from the debtor, who it seems is at St. Mary’s on the Southern frontier of Georgia, he happened to have opportunity of seeing the paymaster who refused to stop […] his next paiment after seeing the debtor. Capt. Lewis thinks […] yet 6. or 8. weeks before the effect can be known. I presume […] to let it go on. and if his brother shall have paid before we get the money thro’ this channel, it can easily be restored to him thro the paymaster. I suppose it better to preserve the advantage of the […] chance. you must not suppose this is a trouble to me. you taught me the maxim that nothing is troublesome that […]. you can do nothing more pleasing to me, than to give me opportunity of being serviceable to yourself or your friends. accept the […] my constant & grateful affections & high respect.<br />
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Th: Jefferson
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</blockquote>
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==See also==
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*[[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 19 June 1801]]
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*[[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 31 July 1801]]
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[[Category: Letters to Wythe]]
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[[Category:Letters and Papers]]

Latest revision as of 15:23, 10 March 2018

Note: In certain areas of Jefferson's letter, the writing is either faint or missing making it illegible.

Thomas Jefferson says that he received Wythe's letter from June 19 at the same time as the first letter Wythe sent regarding the same subject. Jefferson had his secretary, Captain Lewis, take measures to get the payment from the debtor who was located on the southern frontier of Georgia. He says that the payment should take around 6 or 8 weeks if the debtor did make the payment.

"Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 23 June 1801." Image from the Library of Congress, The Thomas Jefferson Papers.

Letter text

Th J. to G. Wythe

Yours of the 19th is this moment received, the moment your former one came to hand. I engaged Capt. Lewis, my secretary, to take measures for procuring paiment from the debtor, who it seems is at St. Mary’s on the Southern frontier of Georgia, he happened to have opportunity of seeing the paymaster who refused to stop […] his next paiment after seeing the debtor. Capt. Lewis thinks […] yet 6. or 8. weeks before the effect can be known. I presume […] to let it go on. and if his brother shall have paid before we get the money thro’ this channel, it can easily be restored to him thro the paymaster. I suppose it better to preserve the advantage of the […] chance. you must not suppose this is a trouble to me. you taught me the maxim that nothing is troublesome that […]. you can do nothing more pleasing to me, than to give me opportunity of being serviceable to yourself or your friends. accept the […] my constant & grateful affections & high respect.

Th: Jefferson

See also