Difference between revisions of "Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 18 April 1795"

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Th Jefferson to G. Wythe<br />
 
Th Jefferson to G. Wythe<br />
 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I thank you sincerely for your book. I shall read it with great pleasure & profit, & I needed something the reading of which would refresh my law memory. <br />
 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I thank you sincerely for your book. I shall read it with great pleasure & profit, & I needed something the reading of which would refresh my law memory. <br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;My collection of acts of assembly are in a very chaotic state. Insomuch that I have not had the courage to attempt to arrange them since my return home. As soon as this is done, I shall send the printed acts to be bound in Richmond after that it will be more easy to consult them, & probably I may be able to engage some young man in Charlottsville to copy acts for those who need them for hire. I have nobody living with me who could do it, & I am [become?] too long, with the […?] & too much attached to the plough to do it myself. I live on my horse from an early breakfast to a late dinner, & very often after that till dark. This occasions me to be in great […] in my farm work. Adieu with sincere affection. <br />
+
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;My collection of acts of assembly are in a very chaotic state. Insomuch that I have not had the courage to attempt to arrange them since my return home. As soon as this is done, I shall send the printed acts to be bound in Richmond after that it will be more easy to consult them, & probably I may be able to engage some young man in Charlottsville to copy acts for those who need them for hire. I have nobody living with me who could do it, & I am become too lazy, with the pen & too much attached to the plough to do it myself. I live on my horse from an early breakfast to a late dinner, & very often after that till dark. This occasions me to be in great […] in my farm work. Adieu with sincere affection. <br />
 
Monticello Apr. 18. 95. <br />
 
Monticello Apr. 18. 95. <br />
  
  
 
[[Category: Letters to Wythe]]
 
[[Category: Letters to Wythe]]

Revision as of 14:40, 1 October 2013

"Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 18 April 1795." Image from the Library of Congress, The Thomas Jefferson Papers.

Th Jefferson to G. Wythe
    I thank you sincerely for your book. I shall read it with great pleasure & profit, & I needed something the reading of which would refresh my law memory.
    My collection of acts of assembly are in a very chaotic state. Insomuch that I have not had the courage to attempt to arrange them since my return home. As soon as this is done, I shall send the printed acts to be bound in Richmond after that it will be more easy to consult them, & probably I may be able to engage some young man in Charlottsville to copy acts for those who need them for hire. I have nobody living with me who could do it, & I am become too lazy, with the pen & too much attached to the plough to do it myself. I live on my horse from an early breakfast to a late dinner, & very often after that till dark. This occasions me to be in great […] in my farm work. Adieu with sincere affection.
Monticello Apr. 18. 95.