Difference between revisions of "Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 12 January 1796"

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T.J. G. Wythe&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Monticello Jan. 12. 96. <br />
 
T.J. G. Wythe&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Monticello Jan. 12. 96. <br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I received last night your [[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 1 January 1796|letter]] on the subject of the laws, and certainly will trust you with any thing I have in the world. A waggon was going off this morning from hence to Varina, and I have exorted myself to send them by that.  As I have always intended to have my copies bout up so as to make as complete a set as I could, I thought it best to do that now, before you begin to make use of them. I have therefore arranged them into 7. volumes, and propose to make the revisal of 1796. The 8th as you will sea by the directions to the book trader. I have ordered the book to be delivered to you, merely that you may open it, see it’s contents, and by delivering them to the book binder acquire a right of pressing him to expedite his work as to all the expenses I shall provide for them through the channel of Mr. Randolph. When done, take the whole collection & keep it till it has answered your purpose. I mean to write you a particular statement of the contents of my collection & it’s deficiencies; but this requires more time than the departure of the waggon allows me. It shall follow by part because I am not without hopes you may have some duplicates from which you can spare copies to fill up the chasms of mine. Adieu affectionately. <br />
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&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I received last night your [[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 1 January 1796|letter on the subject of the laws]], and certainly will trust you with any thing I have in the world. A waggon was going off this morning from hence to Varina, and I have exorted myself to send them by that.  As I have always intended to have my copies bout up so as to make as complete a set as I could, I thought it best to do that now, before you begin to make use of them. I have therefore arranged them into 7. volumes, and propose to make the revisal of 1796. The 8th as you will sea by the directions to the book trader. I have ordered the book to be delivered to you, merely that you may open it, see it’s contents, and by delivering them to the book binder acquire a right of pressing him to expedite his work as to all the expenses I shall provide for them through the channel of Mr. Randolph. When done, take the whole collection & keep it till it has answered your purpose. I mean to write you a particular statement of the contents of my collection & it’s deficiencies; but this requires more time than the departure of the waggon allows me. It shall follow by part because I am not without hopes you may have some duplicates from which you can spare copies to fill up the chasms of mine. Adieu affectionately. <br />
 
P.S. Mr. [Prian?] has formerly done a good deal of binding for me, and would take pains to serve an old customer well.  <br />
 
P.S. Mr. [Prian?] has formerly done a good deal of binding for me, and would take pains to serve an old customer well.  <br />
  
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==See also==
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*[[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 1 January 1796]]
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*[[Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 13 January 1796]]
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*[[Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 16 January 1796]]
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*[[Wythe to Thomas Jefferson, 27 July 1796]]
  
 
[[Category:Letters to Wythe]]
 
[[Category:Letters to Wythe]]

Revision as of 10:45, 27 March 2014

"Thomas Jefferson to Wythe, 12 January 1796." Image from the Library of Congress, The Thomas Jefferson Papers.

T.J. G. Wythe         Monticello Jan. 12. 96.
    I received last night your letter on the subject of the laws, and certainly will trust you with any thing I have in the world. A waggon was going off this morning from hence to Varina, and I have exorted myself to send them by that. As I have always intended to have my copies bout up so as to make as complete a set as I could, I thought it best to do that now, before you begin to make use of them. I have therefore arranged them into 7. volumes, and propose to make the revisal of 1796. The 8th as you will sea by the directions to the book trader. I have ordered the book to be delivered to you, merely that you may open it, see it’s contents, and by delivering them to the book binder acquire a right of pressing him to expedite his work as to all the expenses I shall provide for them through the channel of Mr. Randolph. When done, take the whole collection & keep it till it has answered your purpose. I mean to write you a particular statement of the contents of my collection & it’s deficiencies; but this requires more time than the departure of the waggon allows me. It shall follow by part because I am not without hopes you may have some duplicates from which you can spare copies to fill up the chasms of mine. Adieu affectionately.
P.S. Mr. [Prian?] has formerly done a good deal of binding for me, and would take pains to serve an old customer well.

See also