Difference between revisions of "P. Virgilii Maronis Bucolica P. Rami Eloquentiae et Philosophiae"

From Wythepedia: The George Wythe Encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(by Virgil)
Line 18: Line 18:
 
|desc=Duodecimo
 
|desc=Duodecimo
 
}}
 
}}
 +
 +
Publius Vergilius Maro (70-19 BCE) was a Roman poet born in Cisalpine, Gaul, on the side of the Alps closest to Rome. His family was well-off, enabling his studies at Cremona and Milan, as well as Rome and Naples, the latter under the Epicurean philosopher Siro.<ref>[http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199548545.001.0001/acref-9780199548545-e-3090 "Virgil”] in ''The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature'', ed. by M.C. Howatson (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011).</ref> When land was confiscated following the battle of Phillippi in 42 BCE for the army veterans of Antony and Octavian, Virgil’s family lost land.  They were likely compensated, however, with property near Naples.<ref>Ibid.</ref> Virgil’s ''Eclogues'', his first collection of poems, were likely written around that time, perhaps as late as 38 BCE, as the confiscations were a central topic of two of the poems.<ref>[http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780192801463.001.0001/acref-9780192801463-e-2329 "Virgil "] in ''Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World'', ed. by John Roberts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007)</ref> At some later point, Virgil became part of the poetic circle around Maecenas, putting him in close contact with Octavian, the future emperor Augustus.<br />
 +
<br />
  
 
==Evidence for Inclusion in Wythe's Library==
 
==Evidence for Inclusion in Wythe's Library==

Revision as of 07:52, 21 October 2015

by Virgil

P. Virgilii Maronis Bucolica
George Wythe bookplate.jpg
Title not held by The Wolf Law Library
at the College of William & Mary.
 
Author Virgil
Editor
Translator
Published :
Date
Edition Precise edition unknown
Language
Volumes volume set
Pages
Desc. Duodecimo


Publius Vergilius Maro (70-19 BCE) was a Roman poet born in Cisalpine, Gaul, on the side of the Alps closest to Rome. His family was well-off, enabling his studies at Cremona and Milan, as well as Rome and Naples, the latter under the Epicurean philosopher Siro.[1] When land was confiscated following the battle of Phillippi in 42 BCE for the army veterans of Antony and Octavian, Virgil’s family lost land. They were likely compensated, however, with property near Naples.[2] Virgil’s Eclogues, his first collection of poems, were likely written around that time, perhaps as late as 38 BCE, as the confiscations were a central topic of two of the poems.[3] At some later point, Virgil became part of the poetic circle around Maecenas, putting him in close contact with Octavian, the future emperor Augustus.

Evidence for Inclusion in Wythe's Library

See also

References

  1. "Virgil” in The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature, ed. by M.C. Howatson (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011).
  2. Ibid.
  3. "Virgil " in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World, ed. by John Roberts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007)