Difference between revisions of "Wythe to Samuel Tyler, 10 April 1804"

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Page one of a letter from Wythe to Judge Samuel Tyler, April 10, 1804. Original in the Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William & Mary.
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The obverse and reverse of a letter from Wythe to Samuel Tyler, the nephew of John Tyler. Samuel Tyler attended William & Mary and was a member of the Virginia legislature. He later became the chancellor of the Williamsburg district. This is a letter suggesting that an employee of the court have their salary increased.  
  
 
[[File:WytheToSamuelTyler10April1804P1.jpg|thumb|right|400px|Letter from [[George Wythe]] to Samuel Tyler, dated April 10, 1804. Original in the Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William & Mary.]]
 
[[File:WytheToSamuelTyler10April1804P1.jpg|thumb|right|400px|Letter from [[George Wythe]] to Samuel Tyler, dated April 10, 1804. Original in the Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William & Mary.]]

Revision as of 09:39, 25 October 2016

The obverse and reverse of a letter from Wythe to Samuel Tyler, the nephew of John Tyler. Samuel Tyler attended William & Mary and was a member of the Virginia legislature. He later became the chancellor of the Williamsburg district. This is a letter suggesting that an employee of the court have their salary increased.

Letter from George Wythe to Samuel Tyler, dated April 10, 1804. Original in the Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William & Mary.
Reverse of a letter from George Wythe to Samuel Tyler, dated April 10, 1804. Original in the Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William & Mary.

Letter text, 10 April 1804

Page 1

Hon Samuel Tyler

Williamsburg

Page 2

G Wythe to the hon' m' Tyler

A commissioner of the Richmond chancerie district court, thinking the allowance to that officer for his services scantie, proposeth that it be increased to five shillings by the hour. This, whatever my opinion might as be, i would not presume to do, without concurrence of my brethren. Thy sentiments on the subject will gratifie me. Farewell.

April 10, 1804.