Difference between revisions of "Works of Francis Bacon (Contents)"

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m (Letters in the Reign of Q. Elizabeth.)
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===VOL. IV.===
 
===VOL. IV.===
*A Proposition to his Majesty, by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Attorney-General, and one of his Privy-Council; touching the Compiling and Amendment of the Laws of England. p. I.
+
*A Proposition to his Majesty, by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Attorney-General, and one of his Privy-Council; touching the Compiling and Amendment of the Laws of England. p. 1.
 
*The Elements of the Common-Laws of England. Containing, 1. A Collection of some principal Rules and Maxims of the Common Law, with their Latitude and Extent. II. The Use of the Common Law for Preservation of our Persons, Goods and Good Names; according to the Laws and Customs of this Land. p. 12.
 
*The Elements of the Common-Laws of England. Containing, 1. A Collection of some principal Rules and Maxims of the Common Law, with their Latitude and Extent. II. The Use of the Common Law for Preservation of our Persons, Goods and Good Names; according to the Laws and Customs of this Land. p. 12.
 
*The Maxims of the Law. p. 18.
 
*The Maxims of the Law. p. 18.
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*Ordinances made by the Lord Chancellor Bacon, for the better and more regular Administration of Justice in the Chancery; to be daily observed, saving the Prerogatives of the Court. p. 146.
 
*Ordinances made by the Lord Chancellor Bacon, for the better and more regular Administration of Justice in the Chancery; to be daily observed, saving the Prerogatives of the Court. p. 146.
 
*The learned Reading of Mr. Francis Bacon upon the Statute of Uses. p. 156.
 
*The learned Reading of Mr. Francis Bacon upon the Statute of Uses. p. 156.
*The Argument of Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Sollicitor-GcncraJ, in Cafe of the Post-Nati of Scotland; in the Exchequer-Chamber; before the Lord Chancellor and all the Judges of England. p. I85.
+
*The Argument of Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Sollicitor-GcncraJ, in Cafe of the Post-Nati of Scotland; in the Exchequer-Chamber; before the Lord Chancellor and all the Judges of England. p. 185.
 
*A brief Discourse of the happy Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. p. 210.
 
*A brief Discourse of the happy Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. p. 210.
 
*Certain Articles or Declarations touching the Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland* collected and dispersed for his Majesty's better Service. p. 216.
 
*Certain Articles or Declarations touching the Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland* collected and dispersed for his Majesty's better Service. p. 216.
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*The second Confession of Sir Charles Davers, taken the same Day before Sir Thomas Egerton &c. p. 419.
 
*The second Confession of Sir Charles Davers, taken the same Day before Sir Thomas Egerton &c. p. 419.
 
*The Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt examined the 18th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 419.
 
*The Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt examined the 18th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 419.
*The second Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt, the same Day taken
+
*The second Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt, the same Day taken before Mr. John Herbert. &c. p. 420.  
*before Mr . . 7ohn Herbert. &c. p. 420. '
 
 
*The Declaration of the Lord Keeper, the Earl of Worcester, and the Lord Chief Justice of England. p. 421.
 
*The Declaration of the Lord Keeper, the Earl of Worcester, and the Lord Chief Justice of England. p. 421.
 
*The Examination of Roger Earl of Rutland, the 12th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 422.
 
*The Examination of Roger Earl of Rutland, the 12th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 422.

Revision as of 15:40, 22 January 2019

Contents of the Four Volumes

VOL. I.

  • A NEW LIFE of the AUTHOR. By Mr. MALLE T. p. i
  • Instauratio Magna. p. 1.
  • Praesatio. p. 7.
  • Distributio Operis. p. 12.
  • De Dignitate & Augmentis Scientiarum Libri IX. p. 21.
  • Partitiones Scientiarum & Argumenta singulorum Capitum. p. 23.
  • De Dignitate & Augmentis Scientiarum, Liber primus. p. 27.
—Liber secundus. p. 59.
—Liber tertius. p. 93.
—Liber quartus. p. 115.
—Liber quintus. p. 137.
—Liber sextus. p. 158.
—Liber septimus. p. 195.
—Liber ocravus. p. 214.
—Liber nonuse. p. 262.
  • Novum Organum Scientiarum. p. 269.
  • Praefatio. p. 271.
  • Aphorismi de interpretatione Naturae, & regno Hominis. p. 274.
  • De Interpretatione Natunӕ, Liber secundus. 313.

APPENDIX

  • Containing several Pieces of Lord Bacon not printed in the last Edition in four Volumes in folio* and now published from the original Manuscripts in the Library of the Right Honourable the Earl of Oxford. Append. p.1.
  • Of the true Greatness of the Kingdom of Britain, to King James. ibid.
  • Notes of a Speech concerning a War with Spain. p.12 .
  • A Book of Speeches in Parliament, or otherwise delivered by Sir Francis
  • Bacon the King's Sollicitor-General. p. 16.
  • Mr. Bacon's Discourse in the Praise of his Sovereign. p.16.
  • The Proceedings of the Earl of Essex. p. 26.
  • Of the State of Europe. p. 35.
  • State-Pieces in the Reign of King James. p. 16.
  • A Proclamation drawn for his Majesty's first coming in. ibid.
  • A Draught of a Proclamation touching His Majesty's Style, 2 Jacobi. p. 48.
  • A Certificate or Return of the Commissioners of England and Scotland. p. 51.
  • An Argument of Sir Francis Bacon, in the lower House of Parliament. p. 53.
  • A Certificate to his Majesty, touching the Projects of Sir Stephen Proctor, relating to the penal Laws. p. 58.
  • A Certificate to the Lords of the Council, upon information given, touching the scarcity of Silver at the Mint, and reference to the two Chancellors and the King's Sollicitor. p.63.
  • A frame of Declaration of the Master of the Wards, at his first fitting. p.66.
  • Directions for the Master of the "Wards to observe, for His Majesty's better service and the general good. p. 67.
  • Philosophical Pieces of the Lord Bacon. p. 69.
  • Mr. Bacon in praise of Knowledge. ibid.
  • Valerius Terminus of the Interpretation of Nature, with the Annotations of Hermes Stella. p. 71.
  • Temporis Partus Masculus, five de Interpretatione Naturae Lib. 3· P.95.
  • Filum Labyrinthi, five Formula Inquisitionis. p. 96.
  • Sequela Chartarum, five Inquisitio legitima de Calore & Frigore. p. 101.
  • Redargutio Philosophiarum. p. 107.
  • Mr. Francis Bacon of the Colours of Good and Evil; to the Lord Mountjoye. p. 124.

VOL. II.

  • Parafceve ad Historiam Naturalem & Experimentalem* five Descriptio Historiae Naturalis & Experimentalis, qualis sufficiat, & fit in ordine ad Basin & Fundamenta Philosophiae verae. p. 1.
  • Aphorismi 'de Conficienda Historia prima. p. 3.
  • Catalogus Historiarum particularium. p. 9
  • Fragmentum Libri Verulamiani, cui Titulus Abecedarium Naturae. p.14.
  • Historiac NaturaIis ad condendam Philosophiam Praefatio. p.16.
  • Tituli Historiaruill & Inquisitionum in primos sex menses destinatarum. p. 21.
  • Historia Naturalis & ExperimentaIis ad condendam Philosophiam* five Phaenomenon Universi; quae est, Instaurationi magnae pars terria. p. 21.
  • Norma Historiae Praesentis. p. 23.
  • Historia Ventorum. Aditus, five Praefatio. p. 25.
  • Topica particularia* five Articuli lnquisitionis de Ventis. p. 25.
  • Historia. Nomina Ventorum. p. 29.
  • Venti Liberi. p. 30.
  • Venti Generales. p. 31.
  • Venti Stati. p. 32.
  • Venti Asseclae. p. 33.
  • Qualitates & Potestates Ventorum. p. 35.
  • Origines Locales Ventorum. p. 39.
  • Accidentales Generationes Ventorum. p.42.
  • Venti extraordinarii & Flatus repentini. p. 43.
  • Confacientia ad Ventos, originales scilicet. p. 44.
  • Limites Ventorum. p. 47.
  • Successiones Ventorum. p. 48.
  • Motus Ventorum. p. 49.
  • Motus Ventorumin Velis Navium. p. 52.
  • Observationes majores. p. 55.
  • Motus Ventorum in aliis Machinis humanis. p. 56.
  • Prognostica Ventorum. p. 57.
  • Imitamenta Ventorum. p.63.
  • Observatio major. p.64.
  • Canones mobiles de Ventis. p. 64.
  • Charta humana, five optativa cum proximis, circa Ventos. p. 65.
  • Lectori S. p.67.
  • Historia Denfi & Rari; necnon Coitionis & Expansionis materiae per spatia. ibid.
  • Modus Experimenti circa Tabulam suprascriptam. p. 71.
  • Historia Gravis & Levis. p. 106.
  • Historia Sympathiae & Antipathiae Rerum. p. 107.
  • Historia Sulphuris, Mercurii & Salis. ibid.
  • Francisci Baronis de Verulamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani, Historia Vitae & Mortis* five Titulus sextus in Historia naturali & experimentali ad condendam Philosophiam* quae eft, Instaurationis Magnae Pars Tertia. p. 109·
  • Historia Vitae & Mortis. p. 110 .
  • Topica Particularia* five Articuli inquisitionis de Vita & Morte. p. 112.
  • Natura durabilis. p. 114.
  • Observationes majores. p. 115.
  • Observatio major. p. 116.
  • Desiccatio, Desiccationis Prohibitio, & Desiccati Inteneratio. p. 117.
  • Observationes majores. F. 120.
  • Longaevitas & Brevitas Vitae in Animalibus. p. 121.
  • Observationes majores. p. 125.
  • Alimentatio, Via alimentandi. p. 127.
  • Longaevitas & Brevitas Vitae in Homine. p. 128.
  • Medicinae ad Longaevitatem. Ad Artic. X. p. 141.
  • Intentiones. Ad Artic. XII. XIII. XIV. p. 142.
  • Operatio super Spiritus, ut maneant Juveniles, & revirescant. I. p. 145.
  • Operatio super Exclusionem Aёris. II. p. 154.
  • Operatio super Sanguinem & Calorem sanguisicantem. III. p. 158.
  • Operatio super succos Corporis. IV. p. 160.
  • Operatio super Viscera ad Extrusionem Alimenti. V. p. 162.
  • Operatio super Partes exteriores ad Attractionem Alimenti. VI. p. 166.
  • Operatio super Alimentum ipfum ad Insinuationem ejusdem. VII. p. 168.
  • Operatio super Actum ultimum Afflimilationis Commentatio. VIII. p. 170.
  • Operatio super Intenerationem ejus quod arcfieri coepit, five Malaciffatio
  • Corporis. IX. P.171.
  • Operatio super Expurgationem Succi veteris & Restitutionem Succi novi, five
  • Renovationem per vices. X. p. 173.
  • Atriola Mortis. Ad Artic. XV. p. 174.
  • Discrimina Juventutis & Sencetutis. Ad Artic. XVI. P.179.
  • Canones mobiles de Duratione Vitae, & Forma Mortis. p. 181.
  • Historia & Inquisitio prima de Sono & Auditu, & de Forma Soni, & latente
  • Proceffu Soni* *five Sylva Soni & Auditus. p. 189.
  • Articuli Quaestionum circa Mineralia. P.203.
  • Inquistio de Magnete. p. 208.
  • Franciscus Baconus Lectori. p. 217.
  • Filum Labyrinthi, five Inquisitio Legitima de Motu. p. 218.
  • Cogirationes de Natura Rerum. De Sectione Corporum, continuo & vacuo. p. 222.
  • De Fluxu & Refluxu Maris. p. 234.
  • Indicia vera de Interpretatione Naturae. p. 243.
  • Epistola Thomae Bodlei ad Francisc. Baconum, quae candide expendit ejus
  • Cogitata & Visa* Latine versa ex Anglico, ab Isaaco Grutero. p. 284.
  • Descriptio Globi intellectualis. p. 288.
  • Thema Codi. p. 312.
  • De Principiis atque Originibus secundum Fabulas Cupidinis & Coeli* five Parmcnidis & Telesii, & praecipue Democriti Philosophia, tractata in Fabula. p. 319·
  • Scala Intellectus, five Filum Labyrinthi. Quae eft Instaurationis Magnae Pars IV. p. 342.
  • Prodromus, five Anticipationes Philosophiae Secundae. Instaurationis Magnae Pars V. p. 344.
  • De Sapientia Veterum Liber ad inclytam Academiam Cantabrigiensem. Illustrissimo Viro Comiti Sarisburiensi, Summo Thesaurario Angliae, & Cancellario Academiae Cantabrigiensis. p. 346.
  • Almae Matri, IncIytae Academiae Cantabrigiensi. p. 347.
  • Praefatio. p. 348.
  • De Sapientia Veterum. p. 380.
  • Imago Civilis Julii Caefaris. p. 386.
  • Imago Civilis Augusti Caesaris. p. 388.
  • In felicem Memoriam Elizabethae Angliae Reginae. p. 389.
  • Meditationes facrae. p. 396.
  • De Miraculis Servatoris. ibid.
  • De Columbina Innocentia & Serpentina Prudentia. p.397.
  • De Exaltatione Charitatis. p. 398. De Menfura Curarum. ibid.
  • De Spe Terrestri. p. 399. De Hypocritis. p. 400.
  • De Impostoribus, ibid.
  • De Generibus Imposturae. p. 401.
  • De Atheisino. ibid. De Haeresibus. p. 402.
  • De Ecclesia & Scripturis. p. 403.
  • I. Epistola ad Fulgentium. ibid.
  • II. Rescriptum Procuratoris Regis Primarii, ad Academiam Cantabrigiensem, quando in sanctius Regis Concilium cooptatus fuit. p. 404.
  • III. Franciscus Baro de Verulamio, Vicecomcs Sancti Albani, Almae Matri inclytae Academiae Cantabrigiensi, Salutem. P.405.
  • IV. Inclytae Academiac Oxoniensi S. ibid.
  • V. Rescriptum Academiae Oxoniensis Francisco Bacono. ibid.
  • VI. Franciscus Baro de Verulamio, Vicecomes Sancti Albani percelebri Collegio Sanctae & Individuae Trinitatis in Cantabrigia, Salutem. p.406.
  • VII. Almae Matri Academiac Cantabrigiensi. ibid.
  • VIII. AElio Deodato. ibid.
  • IX. Reverendo Viro Domino Gulielmo Rawley, Sacrae Theologiae Doctori, & Regiae Majestatis Capellano, Amico colendissimo. p. 407.
  • X. Reverendo Doctissimoque Viro Gulielmo Rawleio S. P. D. Isaacus Gruterus. p. 408.
  • The first Book of Francis Bacon, of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, divine and human. p. 413.
  • —The second Book. P.450.
  • The Passages in Parliament against Francis Viscount St. Alban, Lord-Chancellor of England. p. 548.
  • The Last Will of Sir Francis Bacon Viscount St. Alban. p.559.
  • Account of his Debts. p. 565, &c.

VOL. III.

  • Natural History, Cent. I. Experiments in consort, touching the straining and passing of Bodies one thro' another; which they call Percolation. p. 1.
—Cent II. Experiments in consort touching Music. p. 29.
—Cent III. Experiments in consort touching the Motion of Sounds.P·47·
—Cent. IV. Experiments in consort touching the Clarification of Liquors, and the accelerating thereof. p. 65.
—Cent. V. Experiments in consort touching the Acceleration of Germination. p.86.
—Cent. VI. Experiments in consort touching Curiosities about Fruits and Plants. p. 103.
—Cent. VII. Experiments in consort touching Differences between Plants and animated Bodies. p. 120.
—Cent. VIII. Experiment solitary touching Veins of medicinal Earth. p. 141.
—Cent. IX. Experiment solitary touching Perception in Bodies. insensible, tending to natural Divination or subtile Tryals. p. 165.
—Cent. X. Experiments in consort touching the Transmission and Influx of immateriate Virtues, and the Force of Imagination. p. 189.
  • Physiological Remains. Inquisitions touching the compounding of Metals. p. 210.
  • Articles of Questions touching Minerals. Lord Bacon's Questions with Dr. Meverel's Solutions; concerning the compounding, incorporating, or Union of Metals or Minerals* which Subject is the first Letter of his Lordship's Alphabet. P. 214.
  • Dr. Meverel's Answers to the foregoing Questions. p. 215.
  • Articles of Enquiry concerning Minerals. The second Letter of the Cross-Row, touching the Separation of Metals and Minerals. p. 217.
  • Dr. Meverel's Answer to the foregoing Questions. p. 219.
  • Enquiries concerning Metals and Minerals. The fourth Letter of the Cross-Row, touching Restitution. p. 221.
  • Dr. Meverel's Answer. ibid.
  • Lord Verulam's Inquisition touching the Versions, Transmutations, Multiplications and Affections of Bodies. ibid.
  • A Speech touching the recovering of drowned mineral Works, prepared for the Parliament (as Mr. Bushel affirmed) by the Viscount St. Alban, then Lord High Chancellor of England. p. 222.
  • Certain Experiments made by the Lord Bacon about Weight in Air and Water. p. 223.
  • Certain sudden Thoughts of the Lord Bacon's, set down by him under the Title of Experiments for Profit. p. 224.
  • Certain Experiments of the Lord Bacon's about the Commixture of Liquors only, not Solids; without Heat or Agitation, but only by simple Composition and Settling. p. 225.
  • A Catalogue of Bodies attractive and not attractive, together with experimental Observations about Attraction. p. 226.
  • Medical Remains. p. 228.
  • Medical Receipts of the Lord Bacon. p. 233.
  • New Atalantis, a Work unfinished. p. 235.
  • Magnalia Naturae, praecipue quoad U fus humanos. p. 259.
  • A Collection of Apothegms new and old. p.261.
  • Ornamenta Rationalia; or Elegant Sentences, some made, others collected by the Lord Bacon. p· 293.
  • A Collection of Sentences out of the Writings of Lord Bacon. p. 294.
  • Essays and Counsels Civil and Moral. To Mr. Anthony Bacon his Brother. P. 299.
  • To his Brother Sir John Constable, Knt. p. 300.
  • To the Right Honourable the Duke of Buckingham, Lord High Admiral of England. ibid.
  • Essays civil and moraI. p. 301.
  • A Fragment of the Colours of Good and Evil. p.384.
  • A Table of the Colours or Appearances of Good and Evil, and their Degrees, p. 385.
  • To the Most Illustrious and Most Excellent Prince Charles, Prince of Wales,
  • Duke of Cornwall, Earl of Chester, &c. p. 397.
  • History of the Reign of King Henry VII. p. 398.
  • History of the Reign of King Henry VIII. p. 507.
  • The Beginning of the History of Great Britain. p. 509.
  • Miscellany Works of the Right Honourable Francis Lord Verulam; publish'd by William Rawley, D. D. An. 1. 1629. p. 512.
  • Considerations touching a War with Spain. Inscribed to Prince Charles. An. 1624. p. 513·
  • An Advertisement touching a Holy War. Written in the Year 1622. To the Right Reverend Father in God, Lancelot Andrews Lord Bishop of Winchester, and Counsellor of Estate to His Majesty. p. 534.
  • Appendix. An Account of the lately erected Service called, the Office of Composition for Alienations. p. 549.
  • Advice to Sir George Villiers, afterwards Duke of Buckingham, when he was Favourite to King James. p. 564.

VOL. IV.

  • A Proposition to his Majesty, by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Attorney-General, and one of his Privy-Council; touching the Compiling and Amendment of the Laws of England. p. 1.
  • The Elements of the Common-Laws of England. Containing, 1. A Collection of some principal Rules and Maxims of the Common Law, with their Latitude and Extent. II. The Use of the Common Law for Preservation of our Persons, Goods and Good Names; according to the Laws and Customs of this Land. p. 12.
  • The Maxims of the Law. p. 18.
  • The Use of the Law. p. 56.
  • A Preparation toward the Union of the Laws of England and Scotland. p. 84·
  • The Office of Constables, Original and Use of Courts-Leet, Sheriffs Turn, &c. p. 94.
  • The Arguments in Law of Sir Francis Bacon Knt. the King's Sollicitor General, in certain great and difficult Cases. p. 101.
  • Case of Impeachment of Waste, argued before all the Judges in the Exchequer-Chamber. p. 102.
  • The Argument in Lowe's Cafe of Tenures, in the King's Bench. p. 114.
  • The Cafe of Revocation of Uses, in the King's Bench. p. 121.
  • The jurisdiction of the Marches. p. 128.
  • A Draught of an Act against an ufurious Shift of Gain, in delivering Commodities instead of Money, &c. p. 145.
  • Ordinances made by the Lord Chancellor Bacon, for the better and more regular Administration of Justice in the Chancery; to be daily observed, saving the Prerogatives of the Court. p. 146.
  • The learned Reading of Mr. Francis Bacon upon the Statute of Uses. p. 156.
  • The Argument of Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Sollicitor-GcncraJ, in Cafe of the Post-Nati of Scotland; in the Exchequer-Chamber; before the Lord Chancellor and all the Judges of England. p. 185.
  • A brief Discourse of the happy Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. p. 210.
  • Certain Articles or Declarations touching the Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland* collected and dispersed for his Majesty's better Service. p. 216.
  • A Speech in Parliament, 39 Eliz. upon the Motion of Subsidy. p. 228.
  • A Speech by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. chosen by the Commons to present a Petition touching Purveyors, &c. p. 231.
  • A Speech used by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. in the honourable House of Commons 5 Jacobi; concerning the Article of the General Naturalization of the Scotish Nation. p. 235.
  • A Speech used by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. in the lower House of Parliament, by occasion of a Motion concerning the Union of Laws. p. 246.
  • A Report made by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. in the House of Commons, of a Speech delivered by the Earl of Salisbury; and another Speech delivered by the Earl of Northampton, at a Conference concerning the Petition of the Merchants upon the Spanish Grievances, Parliament 5 Jacobi. p.250.
  • A Speech used to the King, by His Majesty’s Sollicitor, being chosen by the Commons as their Mouth and Messenger, for the presenting to his Majesty the lnstrument or Writing of their Grievances, in the Parliament 7 Jacobi. p. 260.
  • A Speech of the King's Sollicitor used unto the Lords, at a Conference by Commission from the Commons, &c. p.260.
  • A Speech of the King's Sollicitor, persuading the House of Commons to desist from further question of receiving the King's Messages by their Speaker, &c. p. 263.
  • A Brief Speech in the end of the Session of Parliament 7 Jacobi, persuading some Supply to be given to his Majesty, &c. p. 266.
  • A Speech delivered by the King's Attorney Sir Francis Bacon, in the lower House, when the House was in great Heat and much troubled among the Undertakers, &c. p. 267.
  • The Speech which was used by the Lord-Keeper of the Great Seal in the Star Chamber, before the Summer Circuits; the King being then in Scotland; 1617. p. 277.
  • The Speech used by Sir Francis Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, to Sir William Jones, upon his calling to be Lord Chief Justice of Ireland. 1617. p. 279.
  • The Lord-Keeper's Speech in the Exchequer to Sir John Denham, when he was called to be one of the Barons of the Exchequer. p. 281.
  • His Lordship's Speech in the Common Pleas, to Justice Hutton, when he was called to be one of the Judges of the Common Pleas. p. 282.
  • His Lordship's Speech in the Parliament, being Lord Chancellor, to the Speaker's Excuse. p. 283.
  • Sir Francis Bacon's Charge at the Sessions of the Verge. p. 288.
  • A Charge delivered by Sir Francis Bacon, the King's Attorney General at the Arraignment of the Lord Sanquhar, in the King's Bench at Westminster. p. 295.
  • The Charge of Sir Francis Bacon, His Majesty's Attorney General, touching Duels; upon an Information in the Star-Chamber against* Priest and Wright. p. 297·
  • The Decree of the Star-Chamber against Duels. p. 304.
  • The Charge of Sir Francis Bacon Knt. his Majesty's Attorney General, against William Talbot a Counsellor at Law of Ireland. p.309.
  • The Charge given by Sir Francis Bacon, His Majesty's Attorney-General, against Mr. Oliver St. John, for scandalizing and traducing, in the public Sessions, Letters sent from the Lords of the Council touching the Benevolence. p. 314.
  • The Charge of Owen, indicted of High Treason in the King's Bench, by Sir Francis Bacon Knt. His Majesty's Attorney-General. p. 321.
  • The Charge of Sir Francis Bacon the King's Attorney-General against* Mr. Lurmsden, Sir John Wentworth, and Sir John Holles for scandal and traducing of the King's Justice in the Proceedings against Weston, in the Star-Chamber, 10 November, 1615. p. 324.
  • The Charge, by way of evidence, by Sir Francis Bacon, His Majesty's Attorney-General, before the Lord High Steward and the Peers, against* Frances Countess of Somerset, concerning the poisoning of Sir Thomas Overbury, p. 330
  • The Charge of Sir Francis Bacon, his Majesty's Attorney-General, by way of Evidence, before the Lord High Steward, and the Peers, against Robert Earl of Somerset, concerning the poisoning of Overbury. p. 334.
  • Certain Observations upon a Libel, published the present Year 1592 , intituled, A Declaration of the true Causes of the great Troubles presupposed to be intended against the Realm of England. P. 342.
  • A true Report of the detestable Treason intended by Doctor Roderigo Lopez, a Physician attending upon the Person of the Queen's Majesty. p. 378.
  • A Declaration of the Practices and Treasons attempted and committed by Robert Earl of Essex and his Accomplices against her Majesty and her Kingdoms; and of the Proceedings, as well as the Arraignments and Convictions of the said Earl and his Adherents, &c. p. 386.
  • Some Particulars of that which passed after the Arraignment of the late Earls, and at the Time of the Suffering of the Earl of Essex. p. 409.
  • The Effect of that which passed at the Arraignment of Sir Christopher Blunt, Sir Charles Davers, Sir John Davis, Sir Gilly Merick, and Henry Cuffe. p. 410.
  • The Confession of Thomas Lee, taken the 14th of February, 1600. &c. p. 413.
  • The Declaration of Sir William Warren, 3 Octobris, 1599. ibid.
  • The Declaration of Thomas Wood, 20 Jan. 1599. &c. 414.
  • The Confession of James Knowd, taken the 16th of Feb. 1600. &c. ibid.
  • The Declaration of David Hethrington, an antient Captain and Servitor in Ireland, 6 Jan. 1599, &c. p. 415.
  • The first Confession of Sir Ferdinando Gorge, Knight, the 16th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 415.
  • The second Confession of Sir Ferdinando Gorge, Knt. the 18th of Feb, 1600. &c. p. 416.
  • The Confession of Sir John Davis, taken the 18th of Feb. 1600. p. 417.
  • The Confession of Charles Davers taken the 18th of Feb. Anno 1600. &c. p. 418. .
  • The second Confession of Sir Charles Davers, taken the same Day before Sir Thomas Egerton &c. p. 419.
  • The Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt examined the 18th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 419.
  • The second Confession of Sir Christopher Blunt, the same Day taken before Mr. John Herbert. &c. p. 420.
  • The Declaration of the Lord Keeper, the Earl of Worcester, and the Lord Chief Justice of England. p. 421.
  • The Examination of Roger Earl of Rutland, the 12th of Feb. 1600. &c. p. 422.
  • The Confession of William Lord Sandys, of the Parish of Sherborne Cowdry in the County of Southampton, taken the 16th of Feb. 1600. &c* p. 423.
  • The Examination of Lord Cromwell, taken the 7th of March 1600. &c. p. 424·
  • The Confession of Sir Christoper Blunt Knt. at the time of his Arraignment; which the Earl of Southampton confirmed afterwards, and he himself likewise at his Death. p. 425.
  • The Examination of the Earl of Southampton after his Arraignment, taken before the Earl of Nottingham, Lord High Admiral, &c. p. 425.
  • The Speech of Sir Christopher Blunt, at the Time of his Death, as near as could be remembered; March 18th, 1600. p. 426.
  • An Abstract of the Earl of Essex's confession under his own hand. p. 428.
  • The Earl of Essex his confession to the Ministers, who attended him, the 25th of February, 1600. p.428.
  • The Apology of Sir Francis Bacon, in certain Imputations concerning the late Earl of Essex. p. 429.
  • Certain Considerations touching the Plantation in Ireland. Presented to his Majesty, 1606. p. 442.
  • Advice to the King touching Mr. Sutton's Estate. p. 449.
  • Theological Works. A Confession of Faith, written by the Right Honourable Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, &c. p. 453.
  • An Advertisement touching the Controversies of the Church of England. p. 458.
  • Certain Considerations touching the better Pacification and Edification of the Church of England. Dedicated to his most Excellent Majesty. p. 472.
  • Concerning the Liturgy, the Ceremonies and Subscription. p. 479.
  • Touching the Provision for sufficient Maintenance in the Church. p. 485
  • A Prayer or Psalm made by the Lord Bacon, Chancellor of England. p. 487·
  • The Student's Prayer. p. 488.
  • The Writer's Prayer. ibid.
  • The Translation of Psalms into English Verse. By the Right Honourable Francis Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Alban. To his very good Friend Mr. George Herbert. p. 489.
  • The Translation of the first Psalm. p. 490.
  • The Translation of Psalm XII. p. 490.
  • The Translation of Psalm XC. p. 491.
  • The Translation of Psalm CIV. p. 493.
  • The Translation of Psalm CXXVI. p. 495.
  • The Translation of Psalm CXXXVII. p. 496.
  • The Translation of Psalm CXLIX. p. 497.
  • An Explanation what manner of Persons those should be that are to execute the Power of Ordinance of the King's Prerogative. p. 498.
  • Short Notes for civil Conversation, p. 500.
  • An Essay on Death. p. 501.
  • The Characters of a believing Christian, in Paradoxes, and seeming Contradictions, compared with the Copy printed Lond. 1645. p. 504.
  • A Prayer made and used by the Lord Chancellor Bacon. p. 507.

Letters in the Reign of Q. Elizabeth.

1. From an Original in the Earl of Oxford's Library. p. 509.
2. A Letter of Ceremony to Q. Elizabeth upon the sending of a New Year’s Gift. ibid.
3. A Letter of Ceremony to Q. Elizabeth upon the same Subject. ibid.
4. To the Queen. p. 510.
5. To the fame, ibid.
6. To the Queen. p. 511.
7. To my Lord-Treasurer Burleigh 1591. ibid.
8. To the Lord-Treasurer Burleigh. 512.
9. To the fame, 513.
10. To the Lord-Treasurer Burleigh. 514.,
11. A Letter to Lord-Treasurer Burleigh, in Execuse of his Speech in Parliament against the Triple Subsidy. 515.
12. To the Right Honourable the Lord-Keeper of the Great Seal, &c. 516.
13. Earl of Essex's Letter to the Right Honourable the Lord-Keeper. ibid.
14. To the Right Honourable the Lord-Keeper of the Great Seal. ibid.
15. To the sarne, 517.
16. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper &c. ibid.
17. To the same, ibid.
18. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper. &c. 518.
19. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper &c. ibid.
20. To the same, p. 519.
21. To the Right Honourable the Lord Treasurer Burleigh, recommending his first Suit touching the Sollicitor's Place. ibid.
22. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper, &c. 520.
23. To the same, 521.
24. To the same, ibid.
25. To the fame, 522.
26. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England. ibid.
27. To the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper. 523.
28. To the same, ibid.
29. Earl of Essex's Letter to the Lord Keeper. 523.
30. Earl of Essex to the same, 524.
31. The Earl of Essex's Letter to the Council at his embarking for Spain, June 1596. ibid.
32 To the Earl of Essex, from Mr. Bacon, October 4. 1596. p. 528.
33. To the Earl of Essex. 531.
34. To the same. 532
35. To Sir John Stanhope. 532.
36. To the Earl of Essex. ibid.
37· To the same, 534.
38. To the same. ibid.
39. To the Queen. ibid.
40 . To Sir Robert Cecil. 535.
41. To the same, 536.
42. To Foulk Grevile Esq; ibid.
43. To the Earl of Essex. 537.
44. To Sir Robert Cecil, at his being in France, ibid.
45· To the same, 538.
46. A Letter of Advice to the Earl of Essex, to take upon him the care of Irish Causes, when Mr. Secretary Cecil was in France 1598. ibid.
47. A Letter of Advice to the Earl of Essex, upon the Treaty with Tyrone, 1598. before the Earl was nominated for the Charge of Ireland, 539.
48. A Letter of Advice to the Earl of Essex immediately before his going into Ireland, 1599. 541 .
49· To the Earl of Essex. 543.
50. A Letter to the Earl of Essex, in offer of service when he was first inlarged to Essex House. p. 543.
51. An Answer of my Lord of Essex to the preceding Letter of Mr. Bacon. 544.
52. To the Earl of Essex. ibid.
53. To the same, ibid.
54. To Sir Robert Cecil. 545.
55. To the Lord Henry Howard. ibid.
56. Two Letters framed: the one as from Mr. Anthony Bacon to the Earl of Essex; the other as the Earl's Answer. 546.
57. A Letter framed as from the Earl, in Answer to the former, 549.
58. A Letter to Mr. Secretary Cecil after the defeating of the Spanish Forces in Ireland. ibid.
59. To my Lord of Canterbury (Dr. Whitgift) 554.
60. To Sir Thomas Lucy. ibid.
61. A Letter of recommendation of his Service to the Earl of Northumberland, a few Days before Queen Elizabeth's Death. 555.

Letters in the Reign of King James.

62. To Mr. Fowlys. 556.
63. To the same, ibid.
64. To Sir Thomas Chaloner then in Scotland, before his Majesty's Entrance. 557.
65. An Offer of Service to the King upon his first coming in. ibid.
66. A Letter commending his Love to the Lord of Kingstone upon his Majesty's Entrance. 558.
67. A Letter to Dr. Morison a Scotish Physician upon his Majesty's coming in. 559.
68. To Mr. Davis gone to meet the King. ibid.
69. To Mr. Robert Kemp, upon the Death of Q. Elizabeth. 560.
70. To the Earl of Northumberland, recommending a Proclamation to be made by the King at his Entrance. ibid.
71. To the Earl of Southampton upon the King's coming in, 561.
72 . To Mr. Matthews, signifying the wise proceeding of King James at his first entrance into England. ibid.
73. To the Earl of Northumberland. 561.
74. A Letter to Mr. Murray of the King's Bed-Chamber. 562.
75. To Mr. Pierce Secretary to the Lord Deputy of Ireland. ibid.
76. To the Earl of Northumberland, desiring him to present the Advancement of Learning to the King. 564.
77. To Sir Thomas Bodley, upon sending his Book of the Advancement of Learning, ibid.
78. To the Earl of Salisbury, upon sending the Advancement of Learning. 565.
79. To the Lord Treasurer Buckhurst on the same Subject. ibid.
80. To the Lord Chancellor [Sir. T. Egerton Lord Ellesmere] on the same Subject. 566.
81. To Mr. Matthew. ibid.
82. To Dr. Playser, desiring him to translate the Advancement of Learning into Latin. 567.
83. To the Lord-Chancellor touching the History of Britain. 568.
84. To the King, touching the History of his Times. p. 579.
85. A Letter of Expostulation to Sir Edw. Coke, Attorney-General. 570.
86. To the Earl of Salisbury, concerning the Sollicitor's Place. ibid.
87. Another Letter to the Earl of Salisbury touching the Solliciror's Place. 571.
88. To the Lord Chancellor, concerning the Sollicitor's Place, 572.
89. To my Lady Packington in answer to a Message by her sent, ibid.
90. To the King touching the Sollicitor's Place. 573.
91. To the Earl of Salisbury upon a New-Year's-tide. 574
92. To Mr. Matthew, imprison'd for Religion. ibid.
93. To Mr. Matthew, 575.
94. To Sir George Carew on sending him the Treatise in selicem memoriam Elizabethae. ibid.
95. To the King, upon presenting the Discourse touching the Plantation of Ireland. 576.
96. To the Bishop of Ely, upon sending his Writing intitled Cogitata & Visa, ibid.
97. To Sir Thomas Bodley, after he had imparted to him a Writing called Cogitata & Visa, 578.
98. Sir Thomas Bodley’s Letter to Sir Francis Bacon about his Cogitata & Viso. ibid.
99. To Mr. Matthew, upon sending to him a Part of his Instautratio Magna. 582.
100. To Mr. Matthew, 583.
101. To the same, ibid.
102. To Mr. Matthew upon sending his book De Sapientia Vetertum, 584
103. To the King, ibid.
104. To the King, 585.
105. To Henry Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall; and Earl of Chester. 586.
106. To the Earl of Salisbury, Lord Treasurer, ibid.
107. To my Lord Mayor. 587. .
108. To Sir Vincent Skinner, ibid.
109. To Sir Henry Saville, 588.
110. Sir Francis Bacon to Mr. Matthew, about his writings, and the Death of a Friend. 592.
111. To the King, 593. .
112. To the King touching Peacham’s Causes. ibid.
113. To the King, 595.
114. Touching Peacham &c. 596.
115. Touching my Lord-Chancellor's Amendment, &t., 600.
126. Concerning Owen's Cause &c. ibid.
117. To the King, 601.
118. Of Revenue and Profit, 602.
119. To the King, ibid.
120. Concerning the New Company, 603.
121. To Sir George Villiers, about Roper'S Place, 605.
122. To the King against the New Company, ibid.
123. Touching the Chancellor's Sickness, 606.
124. To the King, 607.
125. Of my Lord Chancellor's Amendment, &c. 608.
126. To Sir George Villiers, 609.
127. To the same, about swearing him into the Privy-Council, p. 610.
128. To the King, of the Chancery and King's-Bench. ibid.
129. To the King, on the Breach of the New Company, 614.
130. To Sir George Villiers, 616.
131. To his Majesty, about the Earl of Somerset. ibid.
132. To the same, about the Chancellor's Place. 617.
133. To Sir George Villiers about the Earl of Somerset. 618.
134. To the same. 619.
135. A Letter to the King, with his Majesty's Observations upon it. 629.
136. To Sir George Villiers about the Earl of Somerset. 623.
137. To the same, of Somerset's Arraignment. 624.
138. To the King about Somerset's Examination. 625.
139. An Expostulation to the Lord Chief Justice Coke. 626.
140. To Sir George Villiers. 630.
141. To the King about the Commendams. 631.
142. A Memorial for her Majesty, corrected with Sir Fr. Bacon's own Hand, 1616. 632.
143. To Sir George Villiers. 635.
144. To the same. 636.
145. Touching the Commendams, at White-Hall June 6. 1616: present the King's Majesty. ibid.
146. To Sir George Villiers. 644.
147. To the same. 645.
148. To the same. ibid.
149. To the same. 646.
150. To the fame, about Irish Affairs. ibid.
151. To the King. 648.
152. To Sir George Villiers, on sending his Bill for Viscount. ibid
153. To the same, on sending his Patent. 649.
154. To the King, of Sir George Villiers's Patent. 650.
155. To Sir George Villiers, on sending his Patent sealed. 651.
156. To the same, acknowledging the King's Favour. ibid.
157. To the King. 652.
158. To the Lord Viscount Villiers. ibid.
159. Reasons why the new Company is not to be trusted and continued with the Trade of Cloths. 653.
160. To the Lord Viscount Villiers. 654.
161. To the same. ibid.
162. The Lord Viscount Villiers to Sir Francis Bacon, His Majesty's Attorney-General. 655. The Cafe of John Bertram. ibid.
163. To the Lord Viscount Villiers. 656.
164. To the same, about Duels. 658.
165. To the same. 659.
166. A Letter written to the Earl of Buckingham, on the same Day Sir Francis Bacon was declared Lord Keeper of the Great Seal. 660.
167. To the Earl of Buckingham. ibid.
168. To the Renowned University of Cambridge, his dear and reverendMother. 661.
169. To the Earl of Buckingham. ibid.
170. To the same. 662.
171. To Mr. Matthews, in reflection upon some Astronomers in Italy. p. 662.
172. To the King, about a Spanish Match. 663.
173. To the Earl of Buckingham. 664.
174. An Account of Council Business, and of other Matters committed to
Sir Francis Bacon by His Majesty. 665.
A Note of some Precedents as come nearest the Case of the Lord Brackley; referred to in the foregoing Letter. 666.
175. To the Lord Keeper. 667.
176. To the Earl of Buckingham. 668.
177. To the same. ibid.
178. To theKing. 669.
179. To the Earl of Buckingham. 671
180. To the King. ibid.
181. To the Earl of Buckingham. 672.
182. A Memorial for His Majesty. ibid.
183. To the Earl of Buckingham. 674.
184. To the same. ibid.
185. To the same. 675.
186. The Earl of Buckingham to the Lord Keeper. 676.
187. To the Earl of Buckingham. ibid.
188. To the same. 677.
189. To the same. ibid.
190. To the King. 678.
191. Tb the Marquis of Buckingham. 679.
192. To Mr. Matthews, about reading and giving judgment upon his Writings. 680.
193. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
194. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 682.
195. To the King. ibid.
196. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 683.
197. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
198. To the same. 684.
199. To the same. ibid.
200. To the same. 685.
201. To the same. ibid.
202. To the same. 686.
203. To the same. 687.
204. To the same. ibid.
205. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 688.
206. To the Marquis of-Buckingham. 689.
207. To the same. ibid.
208. To the King. 690.
209. To the same. ibid.
210. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 691.
211. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor.
212. To the same. 692.
213. To Sir Thomas Leigh and Sir Thomas Puckering. ibid.
214. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
215. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 693.
216. To the same. ibid.
217· To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
218. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. p.694.
219. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 695.
220. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. ibid.
221. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 696.
222. To the same. ibid.
223. To the same. 697.
224. To the same. ibid.
225. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 698.
226. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
227. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 699.
228. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
229. To the same. ibid.
230. To the King. ibid.
231. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 700.
232. To the same. ibid.
233. To the same. 701.
234. To the same. ibid.
235. To the King. 702.
236. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
237. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 703.
238. A Letter written with the King's own hand to the Lord Chancellor
Verulam, upon his Lordships sending to his Majesty his Novum Organum. 704.
239. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
240. Draught of a Proclamation for a Parliament, referred to in the preceding Letter. 705.
241. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 707.
242. To Sir Henry Wotton. 708.
243. Lord of St. Alban to Mr. Matthews. ibid.
244. To the same, believing his Danger to be less than he found it. 709.
245. To the fame expressing great Acknowledgment and Kindness. ibid.
246. To the same, owning his impatient Attention 'to do him service. ibid.
247. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 710.
248. To the same. 711.
249. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor. 712.
250. Marquis of Buckingham to the same, ibid.
251. To the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in the Upper-House of Parliament assembled. 712.
252. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 713.
253. To the King. 714.
254. To the same. ibid.
255. To the same. 715.
256. To the Right Honourable the Lords of Parliament in the Upper House assembled, the humble, Submission and Supplication of the Lord Chancellor. 716.
257. To the Prince of Wales. 718.
258. To the King. 719.
259. To the Marquis of Buckingham. ibid.
260. A Memorial for his Majesty’s Service. ibid.
261. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 720.
262. To the same. 721.
263. To the same. ibid.
264. To the King. 722.
265. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. ibid.
266. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 723.
267. Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. ibid.
268. Marquis of Buckingham to the same. ibid.
269. Marquis of Buckingham to the same. 724.
270. To the King's Most Excellent Majesty. ibid.
271. To the Right Honourable the Lord Marquis of Buckingham, High Admiral of England. 725.
272. To the King. ibid.
273. To Mr. Matthews, employing him to do a good Office with a great Man. 728.
274. To the Lord Digby, on his going to Spain. 729.
275. From the Lord St. Alban. ibid.
276. An Expostulation to the Marquis of Buckingham.
277. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. 730.
278. To the Marquis of Buckingham. 731.
279. To the same. 732.
280. To the Duke of Buckingham. ibid.
281. The Duke of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. 733.
282. To the Duke of Buckingham. ibid.
283. The Duke of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. 734.
284. The Duke of Buckingham to the same. ibid.
285. To the Duke of Buckingham. ibid.
286. The Duke of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. ibid.
287. To the same. 735.
288. To the Duke of Buckingham. ibid.
289. The Duke of Buckingham to the Lord St. Alban. ibid.
290. To the Lord Treasurer Marlborough, expostulating about his Unkindness and Injustice. 736.
291. To the King. ibid.
292. An Answer to the foregoing by King James. 737.
293. The Lord Viscount St. Alban to Dr. Williams Bishop of Lincoln, concerning his Speeches, &c. ibid.
294· The Bishop's Answer to the preceding Letter. 738.
295· To the Queen of Bohemia. 1625. 739.
296. A Letter of the Lord Bacon's in French, to the Marquis Fiat, relating to his Essays. 739.
297· To the Earl of Arundel and Surrey, just before his Death, being the last Letter he ever wrote. 740.