Governor Henry to George Wythe, the Speaker of the House of Delegates, 11 December 1777

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Letter text, December 11, 1777

GOV. HENRY TO GEORGE WYTHE, SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE
OF DELEGATES.
(From Virginia State Archives, Ex. Com.)
Decr 11th 1777.

Sir

I enclose you a Resolution of Congress respecting the nine Virginia Regiments in the grand Army. I have lately understood that General Stephen is no longer in Service. He was formerly empowered by me agreeably to an Act of Assembly, to reinlist [sic] the Soldiers composing those Regiments248, & for Information of the Progress made in that Business I beg Leave to refer to Extracts of three Letters I recd from that Gentleman, & which I sent to the last general Assembly. In order to continue the Inlistment [sic] of these Troops in the Manner most likely to succeed, I have appointed the Generals Woodford, Weedon, Scot, & Muhlenburgh to conduct it, & have apply’d to his Excellency General Washington for a State of General Stephen’s proceeding therein which I shall lay before the Assembly when I receive it. With great Regard I have the Honor to be

Sir,
Your most humble
Servant
P. HENRY.

For

The Honble

George Wythe Esqr

Speaker of the House of Delegates-


Letter text, December 12, 1777

(From Journal of the House of Delegates)
Friday, December 12.

Resolved, That the Governor and Council be desired to procure, with all convenient despatch, [sic] twenty thousand stand of good arms for the use of the militia of this Commonwealth; which shall be lodged in different magazines kept ready for service upon all occasions.

Footnotes

248On Wednesday, November 26, the Board of War brought in a report to Congress, which was taken into consideration: Whereupon,

Resolved, That it be recommended to the commonwealth of Virginia, to appoint proper persons to re-inlist the soldiers of their first nine regiments, whose times of service are near expiring, and, in failure thereof, to take some speedy and effectual course for supplying their places in the continental army; and Congress agree to allow the men inlisting [sic] for the war, or three years, the usual bounty given to such recruits. Journal, Vol. IX, p. 967.